Words are Containers

“Handle them carefully, for words have more power than atom bombs.”

The following list began one recent evening as I was praying. I asked the Lord, “Would you please speak to me?”

I expected a conversation, perhaps a few sentences or so,  but He simply said, “Word.”

And then He began speaking this list, showing me mental images of what each one indicates. I put off writing it up for a few days, then finally went to the computer and began.

As I typed, word after word came to mind, even just now as I thought I was about through. Words are:

Containers      Explainers     Definers     Descriptors     Expressors
Impressors      Stressors     Reminders    Triggers     Tools    Equipment
Weapons     Armor     Creators    Destroyers     Healers   Deliverers
Revealers      Directors     Commanders     Preventers     Protectors
Comforters      Empowerers     Teachers     Trainers     Restrainers
Discipliners      Punishers     Confusers     Illustrators     Distributors
Distracters     Deceivers     Changers     Carriers     Manipulators
Stitchers     Connectors      Planters     Disguisers    Separators

You can probably come up with a few more.

Words are important. The way we use words is important. The unspoken words too, those non-verbal, physical expressions we use when speaking, are also important. Shrugs, frowns, smiles, leers, raised eyebrows, smirks, wrinkled noses, for instance, can add emotion, emphasize or negate what we are stating.

Why? Why are words so important?

Remember Genesis chapter 1? God created everything that exists and He used words to do it.

“And God commanded, Be, Light.” (Genesis 1:3, literal from Hebrew)

“Death and life are in the power of the tongue.” (Proverbs 18:21)

Words contain power, not just God’s words, even our own words. I think we need to be more thoughtful, more careful, the way we fling words around.

5 thoughts on “Words are Containers

  1. Choosing words carefully is even more important in these days of electronic communications. Without the audio we easily miss/misinterpret the verbal cues as to if something is being said sarcastically or with bitter intent. Authors are good at this, words are their building materials, but non-authors frequently post the wrong intent by not re-reading before hitting “Send” to see if their words could be misunderstood.

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    • Agree, agree, agree. In the 1970’s I taught a Bible college class humorously titled, “Teaching Teachers How to Teach.” We covered a variety of verbal and non-verbal communications but even then I had to define sarcasm or irony. Wow, it’s so much worse these days. Thanks for the comment.

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